How does one check doctor’s credentials in Mexico?

2 comments

I’m thinking of going to a clinic for regenerative medicine in Tijuana and I’d like to check the doctors out ahead of time.

Comments:

The cédula profesional is the doctor’s medical license. Its number appears on their business cards (etc.) by law. We recently had a case of a U.S. doctor practicing here in Tijuana who killed a patient under anesthesia and it was discovered after he hightailed it back to the States that his cédula was a fake. Oops! The Secretaría de Salud issues the cédulas, so they’re the ones to ask. Except they’re not very user-friendly.

You could also contact the appropriate medical college to which your candidates belong. They should have their members’ credentials on file. But there are a lot of medical colleges to contact, and none yet for regenerative medicine.

Our state government’s medical arbitration board used to confirm credentials by e-mail and in English as a courtesy for medical tourists. But they’ve had a change in leadership and are now fairly hostile to medical tourism. They’ve moved their office to an area only locals can find. They’ve forgotten their English. They don’t even answer their e-mail. But their main purpose is corrective, not preventative, so we can’t get too upset with their new policies.

That leaves the International Board of Medicine and Surgery. This is a voluntary organization for medical tourism throughout the world. To join, the doctor or dentist has to present all of their credentials, which are then verified, and she or he has to commit to indemnifying their patients in the event complications arise after the patient returns to their home country. What this means is a standard of care beyond a simple confirmation of the professional credentials and a standard of care beyond what patients normally find in their home countries. This is the future of medical tourism — but the accent is on “future”. IBMS is a young organization: few medical professionals have heard of it as yet.

So, to answer your question, I would say the easiest way to check a doctor’s credentials, under the constraints of medical tourism, is to ask the person if she or he is a member of IBMS and if not why not. The burden of proof, after all, should be on the medical professional to prove they are who they say they are — that shouldn’t be the patient’s responsibility. Good for you for wanting to go the extra mile.

Since you specified regenerative medicine in your question, I know of only two such clinics in Tijuana although there might be others. One is in the Hospital Ángeles and it trades on the hospital’s reputation. Recently a couple of unhappy patients made a stink on the Internet and then disappeared. The other is in the western end of the Zona Río. There is no reason to name either of them here but you are absolutely right to check their credentials.

{ 2 comments }

kaboko4

first try to get there “cedula profesional” if they have one means they are licensed, which doesnt assures u anything, best bet its to see there facilities directly and ask directly for references, if its too good to be true what they are offering well u know the rest. good luck

AnnieMcM

The cédula profesional is the doctor’s medical license. Its number appears on their business cards (etc.) by law. We recently had a case of a U.S. doctor practicing here in Tijuana who killed a patient under anesthesia and it was discovered after he hightailed it back to the States that his cédula was a fake. Oops! The Secretaría de Salud issues the cédulas, so they’re the ones to ask. Except they’re not very user-friendly.

You could also contact the appropriate medical college to which your candidates belong. They should have their members’ credentials on file. But there are a lot of medical colleges to contact, and none yet for regenerative medicine.

Our state government’s medical arbitration board used to confirm credentials by e-mail and in English as a courtesy for medical tourists. But they’ve had a change in leadership and are now fairly hostile to medical tourism. They’ve moved their office to an area only locals can find. They’ve forgotten their English. They don’t even answer their e-mail. But their main purpose is corrective, not preventative, so we can’t get too upset with their new policies.

That leaves the International Board of Medicine and Surgery. This is a voluntary organization for medical tourism throughout the world. To join, the doctor or dentist has to present all of their credentials, which are then verified, and she or he has to commit to indemnifying their patients in the event complications arise after the patient returns to their home country. What this means is a standard of care beyond a simple confirmation of the professional credentials and a standard of care beyond what patients normally find in their home countries. This is the future of medical tourism — but the accent is on “future”. IBMS is a young organization: few medical professionals have heard of it as yet.

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